Tagged mobile development

Monogame – Working with Touch

*NOTE – This may also work on other platforms with touch as well, but this hasn’t been tested on anything other than Android at the current moment. One fundamental aspect to understand about touch and gestures is that code needs structured around the idea of continuous input. Thus, any touch recognition code should be encapsulated…

Vagabond 1.0 – Nearly Here

Yes that’s right. After much toil, and missing my self-imposed deadline for a release, I’m nearly complete with the program and can give it a 1.0 which means that it’ll go into General Availability. I’m not posting Vagabond News on its website because I want that strictly to be a place to get the program from and a reference for information that developers would be interested in. Just wanted to get that out of the way as well. 🙂 Right now the program is about 98% done. All that remains is to test two additional features, push to the repository…

Vagabond – Update

Aside from the getandroidsdkdl script that I was offering for people who wanted to get started with Android Development on Linux, another cool tool I wanted to throw out there was a script I call “Vagabond” which is a Vagrant deployable which automatically configures a development environment that you can use for Android Development on your Linux computer. In fact, it may prove far easier to use it instead of the getandroidsdkdl script (it actually builds off of it). The actual Vagabond script isn’t available yet but I’m letting a rather close circle of friends test it out first before…

Development Journal – Smsr Update 001

I’d like to think that I started working on a rough draft with Smsr and then it evolved into something else. This “rough draft” had a bit of code in it encapsulated in an entity called ConversationThread. A function of this class in particular was really nasty since what it did was take all of the SMS messages on the device and effectively organize them in a cohesive manner that didn’t rely on querying sub-providers like Sms.Inbox or Sms.Sent. The reasoning behind this was that when I would query some of the more specific Content Providers, like Sms.Conversations, the Cursor…

Update

Kid-rows! Don’t ask me what that means exactly because I don’t know either. I just made it up. I’m still plugging away at apps. Smsr is in the process of undergoing a major rewrite. Last weekend I was playing with the SMS Content Provider again and having found some glint of genius in a single moment or realisation, I found a significantly more efficient way to write how it works. Implementing it throughout the project will effectively result in an entire rewrite but what’s computer science without the “science?” Even cooler than that, my talk proposal for the Ohio Linux…