It goes without saying to most that a presidential election in the United States is a portentous ordeal, not just for its denizens but for the world at large. I’m confident that even those at polar extremes await with anxiety for the climax. Some then receiving their due orgasm, others hobbling away with what males call epididymal hypertension, others still revert to inhaling the smog of indifference, retreating to their suburban caverns and barricading the entryways. Arguably, elections have trended toward polarising society; the poles magnetically ripping us all in different directions for singular and presumably orienteering causes that, sans arrhythmia, invariably places at odds your polar base camp with all others. Localised or globalised, this pattern emerges triumphant.

Saving anthropology, scuttlebutt has emerged that this election in particular has the potential to yield one of the highest voter turnouts imaginable. By the time anyone reads this the verdict here will have already been decided, but it is interesting to think about those so-called citizens who are voting virgins or have made a fanfare-laden return to the cradle of the ballot box. Whether it be one’s first time voting, or participating in the civic duty to assuage peer pressure for that right to complain, or to protect the motherland from that immoral snot-faced moron who takes reins diametrically opposed to your own, all serve as valid equally, simply because you did vote. So then if the turnout is projected to be so high, what provoked it in the first place?

Face it – neither Clinton nor Trump are rock star candidates in and of themselves. Most imagine the latter to emerge as a masochistic despot and the former a considerably irresponsible and fraudulent piece of work who seems entirely incapable of adhering to simple email security practises. Neither has satisfied remotely any holistic perspective relative to the qualifications or the performance required by the executive chief. And this is the best we can produce. Of course there were three other choices but frankly I don’t remember their names and, honestly, you don’t either.

That being said, the atmosphere was one of defence. Every single voter who turned out where I live seemed to be voting simply because they didn’t want the lesser of two evils in the office. Undercurrent focus from previous elections most likely reveals this to be case as well; perhaps one could make the remark about this being a wholly uneducated voter. Educated or not, this was the en masse beat of the drum. Most constituents I know are mortified, I mean scared absolutely shitless, thinking about Donald Trump having his grubby paws that close to the nuclear arsenal. In wake of this aspect alone, their vote was cast, by their own admission, for Hillary. Nothing else about her mattered other than she wasn’t Trump. Conversely, my decidedly Republican peers, of which there are many, had a hoot of a time for weeks leading up to early voting access poking fun at Hillary for anything and everything the FBI could dig up on her.

It’s a wonder anyone has any concept of what’s truly going on in the country. While focusing on candidates for highly isolated reasons, disparity between legislature and culture continues to rip society apart at the seems, identity politics chokes us all to death, the Fed runs rampant with freedom of the press further propagating the central banking fraud, global warming is inarguably true but inarguably argued to be false, overpopulation gets as much attention as whomever was on the ballot for The Green Party, renewable energy has about as much of a concept of renewable as does Keurig with their single-use coffee pods, and not a single candidate, not a single one, gives a damn about anything other than the status quo. Thus in defence, one votes to not rock the boat.

I have come to vitriolically despise the word disruption. The lingering bad taste, similar to the one experienced while drinking black tea, grew from those marketers and investors who wanted to disrupt their industries. It has since, in the wake of this election, festered into a tumour on the back of my tongue as it seemed that this was the sole agenda of Republican citizens (not the GOP itself). They sought to rock the boat by voting for a person who seemed to manifest the popular rage against the government. At what cost, you might ask, and in response receive well ANYTHING has to be better than this! And what might that anything be? What is the price of your disruption? Herein lies the aforementioned issue and it can be polled through reflection: I ask a pseudo-rhetorical question, presumably aimed at Trumpists, and by default you’ve likely assumed I’m a Clintonist, and have readied your arsenal of retorts without catching your breath to permit a thought. Disrupt away!

As for me, I voted not in defence or disruption, but in defiance, and was subsequently told that I wasted my vote; you have to love the tyrannical tones that we enjoin on each other. First it’s you can’t complain unless you vote, and then it’s well now your vote isn’t worth shit compared to mine. For president I voted for an author who even now, exiled to the land of the dead, would have made a considerably more suitable fit than what’s on offer today and am content with my choice. So much so that the lumping with all that is unholy, unjust, immoral, and downright perverted is all that I expect from my fellow citizens. Because at the end of the day, the true leader is only ever the one who can afford it.

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